Event paper Deposited for RESILIENCE, in Abstracts

(October 2012) Can social mix be seen as a step towards sustainable communities? An analysis of programmes for area-based intervention in the UK.

Can social mix be seen as a step towards sustainable communities? An analysis of programmes for area-based intervention in the UK. image
Introduction
The quest for ‘cohesive' or ‘sustainable' communities has been one of the main drivers of area-based interventions in deprived neighbourhoods in many of the countries of what is called the global North. Physical restructuring generally affects areas where social or public housing is predominant and involves large-scale demolition and redevelopment with the objective of promoting social mix through housing and tenure mix. Proponents of social mix generally advocate that socioeconomic diversity will strengthen local economies as a result of an increase in demand for services and goods, improve liveability, security and management issues, and, most importantly, produce circumstances favourable for the establishment of new and diversified social networks among residents, which can increase opportunities for upward social mobility among households on lower incomes.
Objectives
This paper aims to analyse policy objectives underpinning area-based interventions in the United Kingdom in the last two decades, ranging from the Single Regeneration Budget (circa 1995) to the end of New Labour's mandate, and to investigate the association between strategies for social mix and notions of sustainable communities-two topics that have been often interlinked and that have assumed centre stage in urban regeneration and housing policie¬s-in the United Kingdom.

Methodology and expected outcomes

The paper addresses the issue through a qualitative analysis of national policies for the regeneration of deprived areas which will involve the use of discourse analysis and the review of academic literature and discussion over the outcomes of programmes such as the Single Regeneration Budget, which was the main source of funding of regeneration strategies between 1995 and 2001 (Rhodes, Tyller and Brennan, 2005, p.1926) and the ‘New Deal for Communities' (NDC) (DETR, 1998; DETR, 2000). It is expected that this paper will contribute to the debate on resilience through the lens of urban regeneration and through a critical analysis of the notion of sustainable communities and social mix.

 

References
DETR (Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions) (1998) New Deal for Communities: phase 1 proposals: guidance for Pathfinder Applicants. London: DETR.

DETR (Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions) (2000) New Deal for Communities: Support and Advice. London: DETR.

RHODES, J., TYLLER, P. AND BRENNAN, A. (2005) Assessing the effect of Area Based Initiatives on local area outcomes : some thoughts based on the national evaluation of the Single Regeneration Budget in England. Urban studies, 42(11), pp.1919-1946.

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Can social mix be seen as a step towards sustainable communities? An analysis of programmes for area-based intervention in the UK. by Tatiana Moreira de Souza is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.